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CR PrevQ - Set 0001

  • From the given options, choose the sentence that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way.

    Most people at their first consultation take a furtive look at the surgeon’s hands in the hope of reassurance. Prospective patients look for delicacy, sensitivity, steadiness, perhaps unblemished pallor. On this basis, Henry Perowne loses a number of cases each year. Generally, he knows it‟s about to happen before the patient does: the downward glance repeated, the prepared questions beginning to falter, the overemphatic thanks during the retreat to the door.

    (1) Other people do not communicate due to their poor observation.

    (2) Other patients don’t like what they see but are ignorant of their right to go elsewhere.

    (3) But Perowne himself is not concerned.

    (4) But others will take their place, he thought.

    (5) These hands are steady enough, but they are large.         

    (CAT 2008)

     

  • From the given options, choose the sentence that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way.

    Trade protectionism, disguised as concern for the climate, is raising its head. Citing competitiveness concerns, powerful industrialized countries are holding out threats of a levy on imports of energy-intensive products from developing countries that refuse to accept their demands. The actual source of protectionist sentiment in the OECD countries is, of course, their current lacklustre economic performance, combined with the challenges posed by the rapid economic rise of China and India - in that order.  

    (1) Climate change is evoked to bring trade protectionism through the back door.

    (2) OECD countries are taking refuge in climate change issues to erect trade barriers against these two countries.

    (3) Climate change concerns have come as a convenient stick to beat the rising trade power of China and India.

    (4) Defenders of the global economic status quo are posing as climate change champions.

    (5) Today’s climate change champions are the perpetrators of global economic inequity. 

     (CAT 2008)

  • From the given options, choose the sentence that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way.

    Mattancherry is Indian Jewry‟s most famous settlement. Its pretty streets of pastel coloured houses, connected by first-floor passages and home to the last twelve saree-and-sarong-wearing, white-skinned Indian Jews are visited by thousands of tourists each year. Its synagogue, built in 1568, with a floor of blue-and-white Chinese tiles, a carpet given by Haile Selassie and the frosty Yaheh selling tickets at the door, stands as an image of religious tolerance. 

    (1) Mattancherry represents, therefore, the perfect picture of peaceful co-existence.

    (2) India’s Jews have almost never suffered discrimination, except for European colonizers and each other.

    (3) Jews in India were always tolerant.

    (4) Religious tolerance has always been only a façade and nothing more.

    (5) The pretty pastel streets are, thus, very popular with the tourists. 

     (CAT 2008)

  • From the given options, choose the sentence that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way.

    Given the cultural and intellectual interconnections, the question of what is “Western” and what is “Eastern” (or “Indian”) is often hard to decide, and the issue can be discussed only in more dialectical terms. The diagnosis of a thought as “purely Western” or “purely Indian” can be very illusory.   

    (1) Thoughts are not the kind of things that can be easily categorized.

    (2) Though “occidentalism” and “orientalism” as dichotomous concepts have found many adherents.

    (3) “East is East and West is West” has been a discredited notion for a long time now.

    (4) Compartmentalizing thoughts is often desirable.

    (5) The origin of a thought is not the kind of thing to which “purity” happens easily.

    (CAT 2008) 

  • From the given options, choose the sentence that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way.

    Characters are also part of deep structure. Characters tie events in a story together and provide a thread of continuity and meaning. Stories can be about individuals, groups, projects or whole organizations, so from an organizational studies perspective, the focal actor(s) determine the level and unit of analysis used in a study. Stories of mergers and acquisitions, for example, are common place. In these stories whole organizations are personified as actors. But these macro-level stories usually are not told from the perspective of the macro-level participants, because whole organizations cannot narrate their experiences in the first person.   

    (1) More generally, data concerning the identities and relationships of the characters in the story are required, if one is to understand role structure and social networks in which that process is embedded.

    (2) Personification of a whole organization abstracts away from the particular actors and from traditional notions of level of analysis.

    (3) The personification of a whole organization is important because stories differ depending on who is enacting various events.

    (4) Every story is told from a particular point of view, with a particular narrative voice, which is not regarded as part of the deep structure.

    (5) The personification of a whole organization is a textual device we use to make macro-level theories more comprehensible.  

    (CAT 2007)

  • From the given options, choose the sentence that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way.

    Nevertheless, photographs still retain some of the magical allure that the earliest daguerreotypes inspired. As objects, our photographs have changed; they have become physically flimsier as they have become more technologically sophisticated. Daguerre produced pictures on copper plates; today many of our photographs never become tangible thins, but instead remain filed away on computers and cameras, part of the digital ether that envelops the modern world. At the same time, our patience for the creation of images has also eroded. Children today are used to being tracked from birth by digital cameras and video recorders and they expect to see the results of their poses and performances instantly. The space between life as it is being lived and life as it is being displayed shrinks to a mere second. 

    (1) Yet, despite these technical developments, photographs still remain powerful because they are reminders of the people and things we care about.

    (2) Images, after all, are surrogates carried into battle by a soldier or by a traveller on holiday.

    (3) Photographs, be they digital or traditional, exist to remind us of the absent, the beloved, and the dead.

    (4) In the new era of the digital image, the images also have a greater potential for fostering falsehood and trickery, perpetuating fictions that seem so real we cannot tell the difference.

    (5) Anyway, human nature being what it is, little time has passed after photography’s inventions became means of living life through images.

    (CAT 2007)

  • From the given options, choose the sentence that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way.

    Mma Ramotswe had a detective agency in Africa, at the foot of Kgale Hill. These were its assets; a tiny white van, two desks, two chairs, a telephone, and an old typewriter. Then there was a teapot, in which Mma Ramotswe - the only private lady detective in Botswana - brewed red bush tea. And three mugs - one for herself, one for her secretary and one for the client. What else does a detective agency really need? Detective agencies rely on human intuition and intelligence, both of which Mma Ramotswe had in abundance.   

    (1) But there was also the view, which again would appear on no inventory.

    (2) No inventory would ever include those, of course.

    (3) She had an intelligent secretary too.

    (4) She was a good detective and a good woman.

    (5) What she lacked in possessions was more than made up by a natural shrewdness.  

    (CAT 2007)

  • The sentence/ paragraph labelled A is in its correct place. The four that follow are labelled B, C, D and E, and need to be arranged in the logical order to form a coherent paragraph/passage. From the given options, choose the most appropriate option.

    A. In America, highly educated women, who are in stronger position in the labour market than less qualified ones, have higher rates of marriage than other groups.

    B. Some work supports the Becker thesis, and some appears to contradict it.

    C. And, as with crime, it is equally inconclusive.

    D. But regardless of the conclusion of any particular piece of work, it is hard to establish convincing connections between family changes and economic factors using conventional approaches.

    E. Indeed, just as with crime, an enormous academic literature exists on the validity of the pure economic approach to the evolution of family structures.

    (1) BCDE

    (2) DBEC

    (3) BDCE

    (4) ECBD

    (5) EBCD

    (CAT 2007)

  • The sentence/ paragraph labelled A is in its correct place. The four that follow are labelled B, C, D and E, and need to be arranged in the logical order to form a coherent paragraph/passage. From the given options, choose the most appropriate option.

    A. Personal experience of mothering and motherhood are largely framed in relation to two discernible or “official” discourses: the “medical discourse and natural childbirth discourse”. Both of these tend to focus on the “optimistic stories” of birth and mothering and underpin stereotypes of the “godmother”.

    B. At the same time, the need for medical expert guidance is also a feature for contemporary reproduction and motherhood. But constructions of good mothering have not always been so conceived - and in different contexts may exist in parallel to other equally dominant discourses.

    C. Similarly, historical work has shown how what are now taken-for-granted aspects of reproduction and mothering practices result from contemporary “pseudoscientific directives” and “managed constructs”. These changes have led to a reframing of modern discourses that pattern pregnancy and motherhood leading to an acceptance of the need for greater expert management.

    D. The contrasting, overlapping and ambiguous strands within these frameworks focus to varying degrees on a woman’s biological tie to her child and predisposition to instinctively know and be able to care for her child.

    E. In addition, a third, “unofficial popular discourse” comprising “old wives” tales and based on maternal experiences of childbirth has also been noted. These discourses have also been acknowledged in work exploring the experiences of those who apparently do not “conform” to conventional stereotypes of the “good mother”  

    (1) EDBC

    (2) BCED

    (3) DBCE

    (4) EDCB

    (5) BCDE

    (CAT 2007)

  • The sentence/ paragraph labelled A is in its correct place. The four that follow are labelled B, C, D and E, and need to be arranged in the logical order to form a coherent paragraph/passage. From the given options, choose the most appropriate option.

    A. Indonesia has experienced dramatic shifts in its formal governance arrangements since the fall of President Soeharto and the close of his centralized, authoritarian "New Order" regime in 1997.

    B. The political system has taken its place in the nearly 10 years since Reformasi began. It has featured the active contest for political office among a proliferation of parties at central, provincial and district levels; direct elections for the presidency (since 2004); and radical changes in centre-local government relations towards administrative, fiscal, and political decentralization.

    C. The mass media, once tidily under Soeharto's thumb, has experienced significant liberalization as has the legal basis for non-governmental organizations, including many dedicated to such controversial issues as corruption control and human rights.

    D. Such developments are seen optimistically by a number of donors and some external analysts, who interpret them as signs of Indonesia's political normalization.

    E. A different group of analysts paint a picture in which the institutional forms have changed, but power relations have not. Vedi Hadiz argues that Indonesia's "democratic transition" has been anything but linear.          

    (1) BDEC

    (2) CBDE

    (3) CEBD

    (4) DEBC

    (5) BCDE

    (CAT 2007)